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Monday, September 28, 2009

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cb on bonanzle

This just blows my mind. I'm sorry, but Rocky Mountain Bank was in the wrong here. Totally in the wrong. They should have reprimanded their employee instead. I would have to question as to WHY did the employee have to email ANYONE a list of sensitive information? Do people NOT know or realize that emailing from one address to another is NOT safe or confidential as we are lead to believe. Emails can be intercepted along the route by hackers and those who use script programs to spy on mail servers and such.

I sincerely hope that Rocky Mountain Bank customers have heard about this story and hope that they close their accounts at Rocky Mountain Bank PRONTO and find another bank to do business at. Rocky Mountain Bank needs to take responsibility of their own f**k up instead of blaming someone else or trying to pretend that a criminal phantom exists when it doesn't.

Just who the hell does Rocky Mountain Bank think they are to take away someone's right to have an email account? Corporations like them seriously disgust me. I hope that whoever the person is that had their email account taken away, I hope that person sues the living sh** out of Rocky Mountain Bank AND Google.

SPAM NAME

Why does searching Google yield my most recent emails?
Recently, I have noticed that after I send an email at work (not using Gmail), if I search for something that was in my email's Subject line, I see as my first link a link to that exact email. When I click on the link, it shows the entire message, including recipients...etc. Help? Could this be spyware and should I report it to my company's IT dept?

SPAM name deleted

Why does searching Google yield my most recent emails?
Recently, I have noticed that after I send an email at work (not using Gmail), if I search for something that was in my email's Subject line, I see as my first link a link to that exact email. When I click on the link, it shows the entire message, including recipients...etc. Help? Could this be spyware and should I report it to my company's IT dept?

brand name

I sincerely hope that Rocky Mountain Bank customers have heard about this story and hope that they close their accounts at Rocky Mountain Bank PRONTO and find another bank to do business at. Rocky Mountain Bank needs to take responsibility of their own f**k up instead of blaming someone else or trying to pretend that a criminal phantom exists when it doesn't.

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