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Monday, May 10, 2010

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Houlihan Smith’s Phony Invocation of Trademark Law Fails to Keep Criticism off the Web:

Comments

AJ

Here's hoping that as a resident of Cook County, no one I know ever comes up before Judge Rochford for anything. Sheesh.

Im

Gosh this sounds so familiar... When Glenn Beck's lawyers filed the domain dispute against me last year, this sounds like the tactic they took - I remember reading about defamation, but I also seem to recall the meat of the argument was a trademark violation... I still have the legal docs all posted at http://gb1990.net/legal/ if anyone is interested...

-Isaac

Paul Levy

Although I have used the domain name and web site that was the subject of the controversy discussed in the post above as an example in discussing section 230, I confess I had not followed the controversy closely enough to know what the outcome was. I enjoyed reading the documents provided at the link above. Briefs written with Marc Randazza's usual panache, and a WIPO decision that goes on much too long but reaches the plainly correct decision as a matter of trademark law.

David Schwartz

Streisand effect FTW.

Steve

Interesting story since I have just been the subject of a DMCA complaint based on the fact I used the company name in my story and they are asserting it is an inappropriate use of their trademark. Additionally, they claim the fact there are ads on my page, determined by an ad network, not me, make the comments commercial.

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