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Thursday, July 22, 2010

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Comments

Rerto Jordans

I like seeing movie rather than shopping. And you?

Peter Hebert

Title IV is mislabeled and misleading. For example, barring arbitration agreements as a condition of a loan application is good. But, where is the criminal component for breach of contract? Most borrowers are broke, which is why they need to take on more debt. They cannot handle the legal expenses associated with litigation in a civil dispute. The point is, while this is a step in the right direction, it is not a true step forward.

Peter Hebert
Author of MORTGAGED AND ARMED (Freedom House Press, July 4, 2010)

Michael Lemov

It is better than surrendering legal rights in advance of a dispute. And there are some pro bono state bar programs that could bring civil caaes for breach of contract or fraud on behalf of a consumer.

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