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Friday, September 14, 2012

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Fred von Lohmann

Paul, whatever the merits of either of these actions, it underscores the distinction between hosting your speech on someone else's platform, and doing it yourself. The Internet still offers the option of buying your own server, putting it in a data center, and paying for bandwidth. And while that may be harder than posting to Facebook or YouTube, I for one am very grateful that the Internet remains the most censorship resistant publishing medium ever.

Louise

Fred von Lohmann, well responded.

Personally, I keep away from all the popular so-called E-social platforms. To me they are nothing more than a clearing house for wannabe "People" of interest. They do not interest me at all and I would not presume to interest them either. Case closed.

What does cause me some problem is the dragging of Article 19, "Freedom of expression” as a shield to many unconscionable utterances or displays. I had to learn about the constitution to become a citizen, and since I graduated from Cambridge (UK), I possess a reasonable comprehension of the English language.

From my reading, Article 19 was not meant to cover up any Dirty Harry deals,
>

If some Internet organizations are becoming responsible enough to try and clean up the Web, I sincerely command them. I just wish that television programmers would do the same. If people were wise enough to apply their own censorship, there would be no need for anyone else to become involved.

Louise

Fred von Lohmann, well responded.

Personally, I keep away from all the popular so-called E-social platforms. To me they are nothing more than a clearing house for wannabe "People" of interest. They do not interest me at all and I would not presume to interest them either. Case closed.

What does cause me some problem is the dragging of Article 19, "Freedom of expression” as a shield to many unconscionable utterances or displays. I had to learn about the constitution to become a citizen, and since I graduated from Cambridge (UK), I possess a reasonable comprehension of the English language.

From my reading, Article 19 was not meant to cover up any Dirty Harry deals,
in fact Article 19 goes on to say that the exercise of these rights carries "special duties and responsibilities" and may "therefore be subject to certain restrictions" when necessary.
If some Internet organizations are becoming responsible enough to try and clean up the Web, I sincerely command them. I just wish that television programmers would do the same.
If people were wise enough to apply their own censorship, there would be no need for anyone else to become involved.

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