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Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Comments

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Well, it does that but you are also paying by the pound for extra salt water, which the companies mask with language like “up to 5% retained water.” And this cranks up the sodium to near-french-fry levels.

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The best you can do for cranberry juice is to look for "no added sugar" (but yes, that means grape juice or another kind) and "filtered water sufficient to reconstitute cranberry juice concentrate" (i.e. not watered down). Again this is from memory, but I recall that, unlike orange juice, you just can't GET cranberry juice that's not concentrated and then reconstituted, even here in Massachusetts, home of the cranberry bog..

bob

I cant help it... the fruits of the forrest pie is there best one! I love it..MMMMMMMMMM

Jay Levitt

Cane juice isn't a vegetable??

No wonder I'm not losing weight.

Steve Gardner

I started to draft a response to Jay Leavitt's comments, but then I saw that he had done so himself in the last two paragraphs of his post. Thanks, Jay!

Jay is quite right that unsweetened cranberry juice is pretty darn tart, but the point of my post was that, because grape juice was used as a sweetener and not for its flavoring qualities, it was misleading--arguably flat-out false--to say that there was "no sugar added." It's little different from using cane juice instead of grape juice, and saying it was a vegetable and thus still "no sugar added."

Sweetened cranberry juice is fine, but Ocean Spray shouldn't try to jump on the no-added-sugar bandwagon in this deceptive manner.

Jay Levitt

The trouble with the first example is that you don't WANT 100% cranberry juice. It's thick, nasty, bitter. It'd be like eating baker's chocolate because of the 100% cocoa content.

I went on a cranberry-juice binge a few years ago, and discovered that, really, nobody makes true "cranberry juice", for exactly that reason. (Actually, I think there may be one brand - the one with the tall, sloping bottles - that sells "cranberry nectar", but again, it's nasty.)

The best you can do for cranberry juice is to look for "no added sugar" (but yes, that means grape juice or another kind) and "filtered water sufficient to reconstitute cranberry juice concentrate" (i.e. not watered down). Again this is from memory, but I recall that, unlike orange juice, you just can't GET cranberry juice that's not concentrated and then reconstituted, even here in Massachusetts, home of the cranberry bog.

Ocean Spray used to make a "Pure Pemium" brand that's like that, but I don't see it on their site now. It was pretty good, as was R.W. Knudsen.

(Update: However, I do see a "Pure Natural 100% Unsweetened Cranberry Juice" there! I guess that's new. I also suspect, as I say, you wouldn't want to drink it. Even their web site says "This is some powerful stuff.")

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